15+ 3D Modeling Terms

3D modeling is a process that uses sophisticated software to create models of anything from people, buildings, cars, and clothes. The creation of 3D models has become more popular in recent years because they can be used for animation or virtual reality. 3D graphics have also been used in movies, video games. In this blog post we’ll list 10+ terms you should know about if you want to get into 3D modeling!

  • 3D Redernding: A process where successive layers of material are laid down to create models, prototypes or patterns which helps designers visualize their creations before they’re manufactured in any way!
  • 3D Sculpturing: A process where successive layers of material are laid down to create models, prototypes or patterns which helps designers visualize their creations before they’re manufactured in any way!
  • Model: A model is a three-dimensional representation of an object. The basic building blocks for every computer graphic are polygons; however if you want something more complex then these will need to be made out of more polygons.
  • Modeling Software: Modeling software gives artists the ability to create a three-dimensional shape from scratch.
  • CAD: Computer-aided design software, or CAD for short, has existed since the 1970s when it was used to make blueprints in construction and engineering for aircraft carriers and tunnels among other things. Nowadays, CAD programs are most commonly found in architecture firms where they’re often used to create very detailed renderings of buildings before they’re actually built!
  • Mesh: A mesh is what gives an object its shape by defining its surface properties such as colors, textures etc. The basic building blocks of every computer graphic are polygons; however if you want something more complex then these will need to be made up with many meshes! For example, cars would need a mesh for the tires and bumpers that are textured with detail so people can tell them apart from other objects on the street.
  • Rapid Prototyping: Rapid prototyping is an additive manufacturing process where successive layers of material are laid down to create models, prototypes or patterns which helps designers visualize their creations before they’re manufactured in any way!
  • Ambient Lighting: Ambient lighting creates light without specifying its source. It’s usually used to give scenes a sense of realism by adding softness and depth to otherwise sharp edges as well as making it easier for folks who don’t have advanced rendering skills (or time!) to make things look good!
  • Bevels: Bevels refer to how you add realistic shading and depth to objects. For example, if you’re modeling a car then bevels would show different degrees of lightness and darkness on the edges that are turning inwards so they look more realistic and fit together better with other parts!
  • Rigging: Rigging is the process of adding bones to a character in order to make it move realistically.
  • Joints: Joints are what give your model its ability to bend and twist, such as elbows or knees on humans. They’re also used for things like hinges and ball joints when modeling objects like robots or cars.
  • Modeling: Modeling is the process of developing a new shape for any type of object, from buildings to characters and animals. To do this, you’ll need good drawing skills as well as knowledge in geometry and math!
  • UV mapping: UV mapping allows objects like clothes to be textured so they can have realistic details such as wrinkles, creases, seams etc.
  • Topology: Topology refers to how an artist lays out the shapes that make up their design; it’s also used when talking about computer graphics. Imagine topology as being similar to a musical score–if one part (shape) gets too stretched out then other parts will start scrambling around trying not to get squished together.
  • Polygon: A polygon is the most basic digital shape. You might have heard of a triangle being referred to as a “triangle,” but if you’re looking for something more complex, it will be made up of many polygons.
  • Texture: Textures are what make an object look like what they represent in real life. For example, cars would need bumpers and tires that are textured with detail so people can tell them apart from other objects on the street! The texture tools allow designers to add different details onto their models’ textures such as marks or cracks where appropriate without having to redraw each individual line.

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